Stanford Research Systems

Sunnyvale, CA 94089

COMPANY OVERVIEW

About Stanford Research Systems

SRS designs, manufactures, and supports a remarkable range of test instruments for research and industry. Since the early 1980s, SRS has delivered hundreds of thousands of instruments to scientists and engineers all around the world.

Contact

1290-D Reamwood Ave.
Sunnyvale, CA 94089
https://www.thinksrs.com/
408-744-9040

More Info on Stanford Research Systems

SRS designs, manufactures, and supports a remarkable range of test instruments for research and industry. Since the early 1980s, SRS has delivered hundreds of thousands of instruments to scientists and engineers all around the world. 

SRS products are used in many diverse fields of research. Our lock‐in amplifiers recover nanovolt signals from noisy backgrounds. Our atomic clocks have 1 x 10-11 frequency accuracy. Our mass spectrometers measure residual vacuums down to 10-14 Torr. Our RF signal generators, digital delay generators and clock synthesizers provide the most accurate, most precise, and most stable frequency and timing signals available.

Operating from 75,000 square feet of company-owned facilities in the heart of Silicon Valley, SRS has been designing and manufacturing test instruments for more than 35 years. Our innovative manufacturing process has allowed us to maintain our renowned product quality and to offer quick delivery from stock.

Articles & News

Mwrf 1023 45rteaser 0
Generators

Vector Signal Sources Reach 6.05 GHz

Nov. 19, 2013
This VSG series provides extensive modulation capabilities for testing devices and components with analog and digital modulation formats.
Editor Columns

Generating Signals With Less Noise

May 4, 2011
One of the almost spiritual quests for many design engineers with any time invested in this industry is the pursuit of a truly noiseless signal source. "Noiseless," of course,...
Content

Frequency Synthesis Takes New Approach

May 4, 2011
Generating microwave signals often requires some form of frequency synthesis, and most designers are familiar with phase-locked loops (PLLs). But the engineers at Stanford Research...