Coax-To-Waveguide Adapters Reach 40 GHz

Jan. 29, 2009
Ideal for test and system applications, a family of coaxial-to-waveguide adapters can be supplied with rectangular waveguide through WR28 for use through 40 GHz. The adapters are available as Option A units with consistent performance over the full ...

Ideal for test and system applications, a family of coaxial-to-waveguide adapters can be supplied with rectangular waveguide through WR28 for use through 40 GHz. The adapters are available as Option A units with consistent performance over the full operating bandwidth. They also are available as Option B units, which are optimized for a specific segment of the bandwidth. As one of the Option A selections, an adapter with WR229 waveguide and Type N or SMA connectors features VSWR of just 1.20:1 from 3.30 to 4.90 GHz. The 50-Ohm component exhibits insertion loss of 0.05 dB. At higher frequencies, an adapter with WR28 waveguide and 2.9-mm coaxial connectors spans 26.5 to 40.0 GHz while suffering only 0.15-dB insertion loss and 1.40:1 VSWR. Option B choices include an adapter with WR112 waveguide and Type N or SMA connectors with a mere 0.07-dB insertion loss over a 1.47-GHz band centered from 7.05 to 10.00 GHz.

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