TCXO Delivers Stability To 7 x 108

May 12, 2007
To satisfy applications that require excellent stability, almost no heat dissipation, and no warmup time, a microprocessor-controlled temperature-compensated crystal oscillator (TCXO) has been spawned. The T1220 offers oven-controlled-like ...

To satisfy applications that require excellent stability, almost no heat dissipation, and no warmup time, a microprocessor-controlled temperature-compensated crystal oscillator (TCXO) has been spawned. The T1220 offers oven-controlled-like frequency stability with temperature that is as good as ±7 X 10–8. Its current consumption is less than 30 mA. The operating-temperature range can be specified as wide as –50° to +95°C. With a rugged package and superior g-sensitivity, the T1220-series TCXO is well suited for portable and airborne applications with demanding environments. It is available from 10.00 to 50 MHz to operate on either a 3.5- or 5.0-V supply voltage. The oscillator's industry-standard package measures just 0.8 X 0.5 X 0.33 in. (20.32 X 12.70 X 8.38 mm).

Greenray Industries, Inc., 840 West Church Rd., Mechanicsburg, PA 17055; (717) 766-0223, FAX: (717) 7909509, Internet: www.greenrayindustries.com

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