Control center Thinkstock

Mercury’s MM-Wave Transceiver Targets Homeland Security

Mercury Systems recently received a $2.2 million follow-on contract from a major defense contractor for millimeter-wave modules for use in a homeland security system.

Mercury Systems announced that it received a $2.2 million follow-on order from a leading defense prime contractor for wideband millimeter-wave transceiver subsystems. The order was booked in the company’s fiscal 2018 second quarter and is expected to be shipped over the next several quarters. The transceiver assemblies, which make use of the company’s engineering skills in multifunction integration (see figure), will be integrated into a high-resolution, homeland security imaging system.

Mercury Systems recently received a $2.2 million follow-on contract from a major defense contractor for millimeter-wave modules such as these for use in a homeland security system. (Photo courtesy of Mercury Systems)

The company designs and manufactures both components and subsystems over a broad frequency range totaling 1 MHz to 140 GHz, with work performed in three Advanced Microelectronics Centers located in the U.S. The millimeter-wave components and subsystems are used for military as well as commercial applications, including automotive collision-avoidance radar systems.

“We are pleased to receive this follow-on order from our valued customer deploying Mercury’s state-of-the-art millimeter-wave technology to protect travellers worldwide from concealed threats in highly trafficked environments,” said Charlie Leader, senior vice president and general manager of Mercury’s Advanced Microelectronics Solutions group. “This is a perfect example of how Mercury’s commercial business model delivers leading edge performance, security, and value to defense prime contractors and government agencies with affordable RF microelectronics solutions.”

Hide comments

Comments

  • Allowed HTML tags: <em> <strong> <blockquote> <br> <p>

Plain text

  • No HTML tags allowed.
  • Web page addresses and e-mail addresses turn into links automatically.
  • Lines and paragraphs break automatically.
Publish